Research Papers

Incorporating remotely sensed tree canopy cover data into broad scale assessments of wildlife habitat distribution and conservation

[+] Author Affiliations
Sebastia´n Martinuzzi, Lee A. Vierling

University of Idaho, College of Natural Resources, Geospatial Laboratory for Environmental Dynamics, Moscow, Idaho 83844

William A. Gould

USDA Forest Service, International Institute of Tropical Forestry, Jardi´n Bota´nico Sur, 1021 Ceiba Street, Ri´o Piedras, Puerto Rico 00926

Kerri T. Vierling

University of Idaho, College of Natural Resources, Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, 975 W. 6th Street, Moscow, Idaho 83844

Andrew T. Hudak

USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, 1221 South Main St, Moscow, Idaho 83843

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 3(1), 033568 (December 7, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3279080
History: Received April 17, 2009; Accepted November 30, 2009; December 7, 2009; Online December 07, 2009
Text Size: A A A

Abstract

Remote sensing provides critical information for broad scale assessments of wildlife habitat distribution and conservation. However, such efforts have been typically unable to incorporate information about vegetation structure, a variable important for explaining the distribution of many wildlife species. We evaluated the consequences of incorporating remotely sensed information about horizontal vegetation structure into current assessments of wildlife habitat distribution and conservation. For this, we integrated the new NLCD tree canopy cover product into the US GAP Analysis database, using avian species and the finished Idaho GAP Analysis as a case study. We found: (1) a 15-68% decrease in the extent of the predicted habitat for avian species associated with specific tree canopy conditions, (2) a marked decrease in the species richness values predicted at the Landsat pixel scale, but not at coarser scales, (3) a modified distribution of biodiversity hotspots, and (4) surprising results in conservation assessment: despite the strong changes in the species predicted habitats, their distribution in relation to the reserves network remained the same. This study highlights the value of area wide vegetation structure data for refined biodiversity and conservation analyses. We discuss further opportunities and limitations for the use of the NLCD data in wildlife habitat studies.

© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Sebastia´n Martinuzzi ; Lee A. Vierling ; William A. Gould ; Kerri T. Vierling and Andrew T. Hudak
"Incorporating remotely sensed tree canopy cover data into broad scale assessments of wildlife habitat distribution and conservation", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 3(1), 033568 (December 7, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3279080


Figures

Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Forests and Their Canopies: Achievements and Horizons in Canopy Science. Trends Ecol Evol Published online Mar 27, 2017;
Precision global health in the digital age. Swiss Med Wkly 2017;147():w14423.
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.