Research Papers

Synthetic advanced baseline imager true-color imagery

[+] Author Affiliations
Donald Hillger

Colorado State University, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/Center for Satellite Applications and Research/Regional and Mesoscale Meteorology Branch, CIRA – 1375, Fort Collins Colorado 80523-1375

Louie Grasso

Colorado State University, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), CIRA – 1375, Fort Collins Colorado 80523-1375

Steven Miller

Colorado State University, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), CIRA – 1375, Fort Collins Colorado 80523-1375

Renate Brummer

Colorado State University, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), CIRA – 1375, Fort Collins Colorado 80523-1375

Robert DeMaria

Colorado State University, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), CIRA – 1375, Fort Collins Colorado 80523-1375

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 5(1), 053520 (April 26, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3576112
History: Received August 12, 2010; Revised March 01, 2011; Accepted March 18, 2011; Published April 26, 2011; Online April 26, 2011
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True-color imagery, which is formed via a weighted combination of red, green, and blue (RGB) spectral information, has important operational applications for qualitative environmental characterization, including the detection of smoke plumes, volcanic ash, and other aerosols that are not as easily discerned in conventional visible or infrared imagery, but may be more readily characterized via color properties. Despite its universal popularity, true-color is currently unavailable from geostationary satellites, and the next-generation GOES-R advanced baseline imager (ABI) will fall one band (green; 0.55 μm) short of doing so. However, approximations exist, and a process for simulating true-color imagery representative of capabilities anticipated from the ABI is presented and assessed here. High-resolution atmospheric model simulations are used to produce the ABI reflective band imagery required for true-color imagery. Those simulations are then rendered at ABI spatial (0.5-km visible) and temporal (5 min) resolution, to provide realistic data, long before the anticipated 2015 launch of GOES-R. An additional analysis, a color-space transformation, is used to assess the true-color (RGB) ABI images. The resulting hue images verify the less-green bias in the synthetic-green band and synthetic-RGB images created on ABI simulated data. Assessing the deficiencies in the RGB process will hopefully lead to an improved and standard means for generating an RGB product from the ABI data stream. Finally, as one of the many product applications of true-color imagery, an example of synthetic true-color imagery with added smoke is presented. The incorporation of aerosol properties into simulated imagery may help reveal the limits of detectability for atmospheric aerosols with future ABI.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Donald Hillger ; Louie Grasso ; Steven Miller ; Renate Brummer and Robert DeMaria
"Synthetic advanced baseline imager true-color imagery", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 5(1), 053520 (April 26, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3576112


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