Research Papers

Analysis of United States Geological Survey spectral library of silicate minerals: implication for remote sensing applications

[+] Author Affiliations
Chaojun Fan

Washington State University, Puyallup Research and Extension Center, Puyallup, Washington 98371

University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Geological Sciences, San Antonio, Texas 78249

Hongjie Xie, Stuart Birnbaum

University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Geological Sciences, San Antonio, Texas 78249

Joan Wu

Washington State University, Puyallup Research and Extension Center, Puyallup, Washington 98371

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 6(1), 063514 (Mar 20, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.6.063514
History: Received September 30, 2011; Revised December 15, 2011; Accepted December 19, 2011
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Abstract.  Hyperspectral imaging is broadly used in the identification of hydroxylated and hydrated silicate minerals, especially at the wavelengths of 1.0 to 2.5 µm. The vibrations of the hydroxyl (OH) molecule, water molecule (HOH), and metalOH bonds, or their combinations, produce prominent absorption features at 1.40, 1.91, and 2.20 to 2.40 μm wavelengths. In remote sensing applications, minerals showing one or two of these absorption features are usually categorized as hydroxylated and/or hydrated, and minerals showing all three absorption features are usually categorized as hydrated phyllosilicates. We examine the USGS spectral library of common silicate minerals and find that some showing these absorption features are not hydroxylated and/or hydrated but with slight alteration or impurities. This implies that the identification of hydroxylated and/or hydrated silicate minerals may not be merely based on these absorption features. Rather, incorporation of geological and environmental background is also important. We further calculate the absorption depths and silicate mineral ratios in these absorption features as references for discrimination. This study provides a cautionary perspective on the identification of hydrated phyllosilicate minerals with respect to mineralogical interpretations of Mars and other planets.

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© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Chaojun Fan ; Hongjie Xie ; Joan Wu and Stuart Birnbaum
"Analysis of United States Geological Survey spectral library of silicate minerals: implication for remote sensing applications", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 6(1), 063514 (Mar 20, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.6.063514


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