Research Papers

Trophic status, ecological condition, and cyanobacteria risk of New England lakes and ponds based on aircraft remote sensing

[+] Author Affiliations
Darryl J. Keith

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division, Narragansett, Rhode Island 02882

Bryan Milstead, Henry Walker

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division, Narragansett, Rhode Island 02882

Hilary Snook

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, EPA Region 1, New England Regional Laboratory, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 01863

James Szykman

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Environmental Services Division, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709

Michael Wusk, Les Kagey, Charles Howell, Cecil Mellanson

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Aerospace Research Center, Research Services Division, Hampton, Virginia 23681

Christopher Drueke

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Aerospace Research Center, Science Directorate, Chemistry and Dynamics Branch, Hampton, Virginia 23681

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 6(1), 063577 (Sep 13, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.6.063577
History: Received February 24, 2012; Revised July 18, 2012; Accepted July 25, 2012
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  Aircraft remote sensing of freshwater ecosystems offers federal and state monitoring agencies an ability to meet their assessment requirements by rapidly acquiring information on ecosystem responses to environmental change for water bodies that are below the resolution of space-based platforms. During this study, hyperspectral data were collected over a two-day period from glacial lakes, ponds, and man-made reservoirs in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. These lakes ranged from five to greater than 1600 hectares and oligotrophic-mesotrophic to eutrophic and hypereutrophic conditions. Water samples were collected by several New England state agencies coincident with the airborne remote-sensing flights to provide ground reference data for algorithm development and testing. Using an inverse modeling approach remotely sensed reflectances from the near-infrared to red portion of the spectrum were used to develop an empirical model to estimate chlorophyll a concentrations. The accuracy of the algorithm was assessed from the RSM error of predicted and measured chlorophyll values for all lakes sampled. Results showed a strong statistical relationship between measured and predicted values. The predicted chlorophyll concentrations were used to assess the biological condition, trophic status, and recreational risk to human health for the New England lakes and ponds surveyed.

Figures in this Article
© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Darryl J. Keith ; Bryan Milstead ; Henry Walker ; Hilary Snook ; James Szykman, et al.
"Trophic status, ecological condition, and cyanobacteria risk of New England lakes and ponds based on aircraft remote sensing", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 6(1), 063577 (Sep 13, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.6.063577


Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.