Research Papers

Effect of dew on aircraft-based passive microwave observations over an agricultural domain

[+] Author Affiliations
Jinyang Du

Jointly Sponsored by the Institute of Remote Sensing Applications of Chinese Academy of Sciences and Beijing Normal University, State Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing Science, Datun Road, Beijing 100101, China

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory, 10300 Baltimore Avenue, Beltsville, Maryland 20705

Thomas J. Jackson, Rajat Bindlish, Michael H. Cosh

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory, 10300 Baltimore Avenue, Beltsville, Maryland 20705

Li Li

Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7223, Building 2/220, 4555 Overlook Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20375

Brian K. Hornbuckle

Iowa State University of Science and Technology, 3007 Agronomy Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011-1010

Erik D. Kabela

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 6(1), 063571 (Sep 14, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.6.063571
History: Received August 23, 2011; Revised June 20, 2012; Accepted August 1, 2012
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Abstract.  Microwave remote sensing can provide reliable measurements of surface soil moisture. However, some land surface conditions can have a perturbing influence on soil moisture retrievals. In the soil moisture experiments in 2005 (SMEX05), we attempted to contribute to the understanding of the effect of dew using concurrent ground and aircraft observations. Early morning flights were conducted with an airborne microwave radiometer from June 19 to July 2, 2005, in Iowa, USA over an agricultural domain. Results of the experiment indicated that dew had a small but measurable effect on the observed 10.7-GHz brightness temperatures. The results indicate that the H-pol emissivity increased 0.015 to 0.04 for the corn sites, 0.014 to 0.02 for soybean, and 0.01 for forest sites as dew evaporated. These results suggest that the presence of dew decreases X-band land surface emissivity slightly and the effect of dew varies with vegetation types. Our findings are consistent with other works in the literature that has found that the effect of dew depends on both the type of vegetation and the wavelength of observation, but further studies should be conducted to verify this hypothesis.

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© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Jinyang Du ; Thomas J. Jackson ; Rajat Bindlish ; Michael H. Cosh ; Li Li, et al.
"Effect of dew on aircraft-based passive microwave observations over an agricultural domain", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 6(1), 063571 (Sep 14, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.6.063571


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