Research Papers

Assessment of carbon storage and biomass on minelands reclaimed to grassland environments using Landsat spectral indices

[+] Author Affiliations
Sheila A. Kazar, Timothy A. Warner

West Virginia University, Department of Geology and Geography, 98 Beechurst Avenue, 330 Brooks Hall, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6300

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 7(1), 073583 (Feb 25, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.7.073583
History: Received October 31, 2011; Revised January 3, 2013; Accepted February 12, 2013
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Abstract.  This study investigated carbon (C) storage and biomass in grasslands of West Virginia reclaimed surface minesites. Mine-related disturbance and subsequent reclamation may be an important component of C cycling. Biomass and C storage generally increased for the first five years after reclamation, but then declined, suggesting a nonlinear pattern to vegetation recovery. Three 2007 Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus images were used to assess the potential to predict biomass from raw red and near infrared radiance, the tasseled cap transformation (TC), and four vegetation indices [normalized difference vegetation index, enhanced vegetation index (EVI), triangular vegetation index, and the soil adjusted vegetation index]. TC greenness and EVI were most strongly correlated with biomass and illustrate a modest potential for monitoring vegetation recovery in reclaimed minelands. Additionally, a number of regression models that included age since reclamation and spectral indices were statistically significant suggesting a temporal recovery pattern amongst minesites in this study.

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Citation

Sheila A. Kazar and Timothy A. Warner
"Assessment of carbon storage and biomass on minelands reclaimed to grassland environments using Landsat spectral indices", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 7(1), 073583 (Feb 25, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.7.073583


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