Research Papers

Calculation of the energy loss in giant magnetic impedance elements using the complex magnetic permeability spectra

[+] Author Affiliations
Driton Rustemaj

London South Bank University, Department of Engineering and Design, Faculty of Engineering Science and the Built Environment, 103 Borough Road, London, SE1 0AA, United Kingdom

Debashis Mukherjee

London South Bank University, Department of Engineering and Design, Faculty of Engineering Science and the Built Environment, 103 Borough Road, London, SE1 0AA, United Kingdom

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 7(1), 073496 (Oct 18, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.7.073496
History: Received June 18, 2013; Revised September 24, 2013; Accepted September 25, 2013
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Abstract.  The giant magnetic impedance (GMI) effect in ferromagnetic materials has been investigated for sensing applications. The GMI properties were evaluated via numerical solution of the complex magnetic permeability of the material. MATLAB® simulation was carried out to study the frequency dependence of magnetic permeability via obtaining solutions of the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert (LLG) and the Maxwell’s equations. The results indicate that the complex magnetic permeability peaks at a frequency of 6 GHz, corresponding to the ferromagnetic resonant (FMR) frequency, where the energy loss is maximum. A variation of the Gilbert damping parameter (α) associated with the LLG equation inversely affects this peak value. The area under the curve of complex magnetic permeability, calculated through counting the number of pixels within the image, provides an estimate of the average energy loss density within the material and appears to be consistent with the variation of the peak intensity.

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© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

Magnetism

Citation

Driton Rustemaj and Debashis Mukherjee
"Calculation of the energy loss in giant magnetic impedance elements using the complex magnetic permeability spectra", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 7(1), 073496 (Oct 18, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.7.073496


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