Research Papers

Modeling evapotranspiration and its partitioning over a semiarid shrub ecosystem from satellite imagery: a multiple validation

[+] Author Affiliations
Yuting Yang

Tsinghua University, Department of Hydraulic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing 100084, China

National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training, Adelaide, South Australia 5001, Australia

Flinders University, School of the Environment, Adelaide, South Australia 5001, Australia

Russell L. Scott

Southwest Watershed Research Center, USDA-ARS, 2000 E. Allen Road., Tucson, Arizona 85719

Songhao Shang

Tsinghua University, Department of Hydraulic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing 100084, China

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 7(1), 073495 (Oct 25, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.7.073495
History: Received June 1, 2013; Revised September 24, 2013; Accepted October 1, 2013
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Abstract.  Numerous modeling approaches have been proposed to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) and its partitioning between evaporation from soil (E) and transpiration from vegetation (T) over the last several decades. Although these ET models claimed to give reasonable E and T partitioning, few studies have compared their modeling results with direct E and T observations. In this study, a hybrid dual source scheme and trapezoid framework based evapotranspiration model (HTEM) fed with MODIS data was applied in a Chihuahuan Desert shrubland during the growing season of 2003 and validated with direct ET measurement using the Bowen-ratio technique and T measurement using scaled-up sap-flow measurements. Results show that the HTEM is capable of decomposing the remotely sensed land surface temperature into temperature components (soil and canopy temperatures) and providing accurate E and T estimates. At satellite overpass time, the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of estimated latent heat flux (LE) is 47.7W/m2. The agreement between estimated and simulated LE was largely improved when observed net radiation and ground heat flux were used (35.1W/m2). At daily scale, the RMSE of estimated daily ET, E, and T are 0.52, 0.36, and 0.41mm/day, respectively.

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© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Yuting Yang ; Russell L. Scott and Songhao Shang
"Modeling evapotranspiration and its partitioning over a semiarid shrub ecosystem from satellite imagery: a multiple validation", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 7(1), 073495 (Oct 25, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.7.073495


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