Research Papers

Coastline movement and change along the Bohai Sea from 1987 to 2012

[+] Author Affiliations
Longhai Zhu

Ocean University of China, Ministry of Education, Key Lab of Submarine Geosciences and Prospecting Techniques, Qingdao 266100, China

Ocean University of China, College of Marine Geosciences, Qingdao 266100, Shandong, China

Jianzheng Wu

Ocean University of China, Ministry of Education, Key Lab of Submarine Geosciences and Prospecting Techniques, Qingdao 266100, China

Ocean University of China, College of Marine Geosciences, Qingdao 266100, Shandong, China

Zhenqiang Xu

Ocean University of China, College of Marine Geosciences, Qingdao 266100, Shandong, China

China Geological Survey, Beijing 100037, China

Yongchen Xu

Ocean University of China, No. 238, Songling Road, Qingdao 266100, Shandong, China

Jian Lin

China Geological Survey, Beijing 100037, China

Rijun Hu

Ocean University of China, Ministry of Education, Key Lab of Submarine Geosciences and Prospecting Techniques, Qingdao 266100, China

Ocean University of China, College of Marine Geosciences, Qingdao 266100, Shandong, China

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 8(1), 083585 (Jul 24, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.8.083585
History: Received December 25, 2013; Revised June 10, 2014; Accepted June 27, 2014
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Abstract.  Using multitemporal remote sensing data from 1987 to 2012, this study extracted the coastlines along the Bohai Sea and explored the relationship between coastline change and human activity. Our results indicate that the general pattern of coastline change can be divided into two stages: a slow-change stage (1987 to 2002) and a rapid-change stage (2002 to 2012). The total area of the Bohai Sea decreased by 1593.44km2 from 1987 to 2012, at an average rate of 63.7km2/year. The total length of coastline along the Bohai Sea increased by 633.7 km at an average rate of 25.3km/year. The length of natural coastline decreased by 836.2 km at an average rate of 33.4km/year. The length of artificial coastline increased by 1469.9 km, at an average rate of 58.8km/year. The artificial coastline composed 27.07% and 74.16% of the total coastline lengths in 1987 and 2012, respectively. The natural coastline was the main coastline type in 1987. However, the natural coastline composed only 25.84% of the total coastline in 2012. The maximum progradation in the Bohai Bay occurred in Caofeidian, where the coastline advanced seaward by 19630.33m, at an average rate of 785.23m/year. The maximum erosion occurred at the head of the abandoned Diaokou promontories, where the coastline retreated landward by 4758.01m, at an average rate of 190.33m/year. Possible explanations for the coastline changes along the Bohai Sea include natural factors (e.g., riverine sediment supply and hydrodynamic conditions) and human impacts (e.g., reclamation projects), which can be primarily attributed to anthropogenic activities, coastline type, and rapid changes in the Bohai Sea since 2002. The majority of the coastline changes were caused by land reclamation and the construction of embankments. The effects of tides and waves were relatively minimal.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Longhai Zhu ; Jianzheng Wu ; Zhenqiang Xu ; Yongchen Xu ; Jian Lin, et al.
"Coastline movement and change along the Bohai Sea from 1987 to 2012", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 8(1), 083585 (Jul 24, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.8.083585


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