Remote Sensing Applications and Decision Support

Effective surface areas for optimal correlations between surface brightness and air temperatures in an urban environment

[+] Author Affiliations
Huade Guan

Flinders University, School of the Environment, Sturt Road, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia

National Center for Groundwater Research and Training, Sturt Road, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia

Andrew McGrath

Flinders University, School of the Environment, Sturt Road, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia

Flinders University, Airborne Research Australia, Dakota Drive, Parafield Airport, SA 5106, Australia

Roger Clay

University of Adelaide, School of Chemistry and Physics, North Terrace, Adelaide 5005, Australia

Cäcilia Ewenz, Simon Benger, John Bennett

Flinders University, School of the Environment, Sturt Road, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 9(1), 096059 (Apr 28, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.9.096059
History: Received January 21, 2015; Accepted April 2, 2015
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Abstract.  We perform correlation analysis between air temperature and surface brightness temperature over the Adelaide Central Business District and the surrounding parklands. The results indicate that three effective surface areas associated with three different mechanisms exist. They are the effective surface area with upward sensible heat transfer to heat up and maintain the air temperature, the effective surface area with downward sensible heat transfer to cool down the air, and the effective surface area related to very localized conditions (e.g., sky-view factors). The three mechanisms occur at different times of the day and result in different air temperature and surface temperature correlations. The first effective surface area exists in the daytime after the surface is heated up by solar radiation and can persist into the night, particularly in urban environments. The second effective area occurs in night-time when the surface has been cooled down sufficiently. The third effective area coexists with the second one and has a weaker correlation between the surface and air temperatures. It was also found that in an urban area, exclusion of roof pixels in the calculation of surface brightness temperature can increase the correlation between the surface and air temperatures in the middle of the night.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Huade Guan ; Andrew McGrath ; Roger Clay ; Cäcilia Ewenz ; Simon Benger, et al.
"Effective surface areas for optimal correlations between surface brightness and air temperatures in an urban environment", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 9(1), 096059 (Apr 28, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.9.096059


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