Remote Sensing Applications and Decision Support

Hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy: a promising method for the biogeochemical analysis of lake sediments

[+] Author Affiliations
Christoph Butz, Martin Grosjean, Daniela Fischer, Stefan Wunderle

University of Bern, Institute of Geography and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, Erlachstrasse 9a, Bern CH-3012, Switzerland

Wojciech Tylmann

University of Gdansk, Institute of Geography, Bazynskiego 4, Gdansk 80-952, Poland

Bert Rein

GeoConsult Rein, Gartenstrasse 26-28, Oppenheim D-55276, Germany

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 9(1), 096031 (Jul 07, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.9.096031
History: Received February 25, 2015; Accepted June 4, 2015
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Abstract.  We investigate the potential of hyperspectral imaging spectrometry for the analysis of fresh sediment cores. A sediment-core-scanning system equipped with a camera working in the visual to near-infrared range (400 to 1000 nm) is described and a general methodology for processing and calibrating spectral data from sediments is proposed. We present an application from organic sediments of Lake Jaczno, a freshwater lake with biochemical varves in northern Poland. The sedimentary pigment bacteriopheophytin a (BPhe a) is diagnostic for anoxia in lakes and, therefore, an important ecological indicator. Calibration of the spectral data (BPhe a absorption 800 to 900 nm) to absolute BPhe a concentrations, as measured by high-performance-liquid-chromatography, reveals that sedimentary BPhe a concentrations can be estimated from spectral data with a model uncertainty of 10%. Based on this calibration model, we use the hyperspectral data from the sediment core to produce high-resolution intensity maps and time series of relative BPhe a concentrations (10 to 20 data points per year, pixel resolution 70×70μm2). We conclude that hyperspectral imaging is a very cost- and time-efficient method for the analysis of lake sediments and provides insight into the spatiotemporal structures of biogeochemical species at a degree of detail that is not possible with wet chemical analyses.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Christoph Butz ; Martin Grosjean ; Daniela Fischer ; Stefan Wunderle ; Wojciech Tylmann, et al.
"Hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy: a promising method for the biogeochemical analysis of lake sediments", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 9(1), 096031 (Jul 07, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.9.096031


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