Remote Sensing Applications and Decision Support

Remote sensing and habitat mapping for bearded capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus): landscapes for the use of stone tools

[+] Author Affiliations
Allison M. Howard

University of Maryland, Department of Biology, 1210 Biology-Psychology Building, College Park, Maryland 20742, United States

University of Georgia, Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, 210 Field Street, Athens, Georgia 30602, United States

Nathan Nibbelink

University of Georgia, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, 180 East Green Street, Athens, Georgia 30602, United States

Sergio Bernardes

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771, United States

University of Georgia, Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, 210 Field Street, Athens, Georgia 30602, United States

Dorothy M. Fragaszy

University of Georgia, 125 Baldwin Street, Department of Psychology, Athens, Georgia 30602, United States

Marguerite Madden

University of Georgia, Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, 210 Field Street, Athens, Georgia 30602, United States

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 9(1), 096020 (Aug 19, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.9.096020
History: Received March 17, 2015; Accepted July 22, 2015
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Abstract.  Application of remote sensing and geographic information systems to the characterization of wildlife habitats is an area of growing significance for conservation. We examine the use of space of a group of bearded capuchin monkeys, a species unique in their use of stone tools to extract encapsulated foods. We define important landscape variables associated with the monkeys’ behavior, especially the use of stone tools. Maximum entropy modeling is used to define the landscape characteristics associated with the monkeys’ use of space. The variables evaluated in model building include normalized difference vegetation index, distance to roads, distance to areas of human influence, distance to vertical scarps, elevation, land cover/land use class, and percentages of green vegetation, bare soil, and shadow from spectral mixture analysis. Distance to areas of human influence and distance to vertical scarps were the variables most closely associated with capuchin habitat suitability (permutation importance 31.7% and 21%, respectively). Stone tool use occurred in areas of lower elevation and higher percent green vegetation relative to other behavior. These results may inform efforts for conserving the unique stone tool use of this species, especially relevant due to the recent expansion and intensification of industrial agriculture in the region.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Allison M. Howard ; Nathan Nibbelink ; Sergio Bernardes ; Dorothy M. Fragaszy and Marguerite Madden
"Remote sensing and habitat mapping for bearded capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus): landscapes for the use of stone tools", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 9(1), 096020 (Aug 19, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.9.096020


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