Remote Sensing Applications and Decision Support

Monitoring changes in the water volume of Hulun Lake by integrating satellite altimetry data and Landsat images between 1992 and 2010

[+] Author Affiliations
Jiajia Zheng, Zhude Shao

Nanjing University, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science and Technology, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing 210023, China

Collaborative Innovation Center of Novel Software Technology and Industrialization, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing 210023, China

Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing 210023, China

Changqing Ke

Collaborative Innovation Center of Novel Software Technology and Industrialization, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing 210023, China

Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing 210023, China

Nanjing University, Key Laboratory for Satellite Mapping Technology and Applications of State Administration of Surveying, Mapping and Geoinformation of China, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing 210023, China

Fei Li

Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 73 East Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008, China

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 10(1), 016029 (Mar 29, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.10.016029
History: Received November 5, 2015; Accepted February 29, 2016
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Abstract.  Lake level and volume are sensitive to climate change, and their changes can affect the sustainable utilization of regional water resources. Satellite radar/laser altimetry has effectively been used for monitoring water-level changes in recent years. In this study, satellite altimetry data and optical images were used to assess the changes in water level, area, and volume of Hulun Lake in north-eastern China. We derived a time series of lake levels for nearly two decades (1992 to 2010) from the altimetry data of two satellite sensors (Topex/Poseidon and Envisat RA-2); additionally, lake surface extent was extracted from Landsat TM/ETM+ images during the same period. The results indicate that the water level, area, and volume of Hulun Lake decreased over the past two decades. The water level shows a significant decrease (0.36  m/year) of a total of 5.21  m from 1992 to 2010, specifically including a slight decrease (0.4  m) during 1992 to 1999 and a sudden drop (4.81  m) during 2000 to 2010. There has also been a consistent and significant reduction in lake area (355.35  km2) and volume (12.92  km3). An integrated examination on changes in temperature, evaporation, precipitation, and runoff during 1992 to 2010 shows that the main changes in the Hulun Lake area are correlated with increasing temperature (0.47°C/year) and evaporation (13.61  mm/year), as well as decreasing precipitation (6.58  mm/year) and runoff (1.04×108  m3/year). Thus, we infer that climate warming is likely the main cause of the changes in water level, area, and volume of Hulun Lake. In addition, anthropogenic factors accelerate the degradation of the Hulun Lake wetland to some extent.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Jiajia Zheng ; Changqing Ke ; Zhude Shao and Fei Li
"Monitoring changes in the water volume of Hulun Lake by integrating satellite altimetry data and Landsat images between 1992 and 2010", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 10(1), 016029 (Mar 29, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.10.016029


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