Remote Sensing Applications and Decision Support

Reduction of radar performance for target detection within forests

[+] Author Affiliations
Paula Gómez-Pérez

Centro Universitario de la Defensa, Escuela Naval Militar (Defense University Center, Spanish Naval Academy), Plaza de España s/n, Marín 36920, Spain

Íñigo Cuiñas, Marcos Crego-García

Universidade de Vigo, Dept. de Teoría do Sinal e Comunicacións, Vigo 36310,Spain

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 10(2), 026028 (Jun 01, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.10.026028
History: Received January 26, 2016; Accepted May 9, 2016
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Abstract.  Radar performance has improved substantially from the first prototypes until current modern systems. Nowadays, technical advances run parallel to the development of new materials and shapes able to shield different targets or even make them invisible to the radar. This paper introduces the shielding phenomena from another point of view, dealing with the usage of forested radio propagation channels to degrade radar performance. Based on measurements carried out in five different forest and meadow scenarios, we study the probability of detection of a target located within such environments. Depending on the type of target, the frequency, and the vegetated surroundings, we demonstrate that a forest can provide radar invisibility even to large targets, reducing the probability of detection to values below 0.1.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Paula Gómez-Pérez ; Íñigo Cuiñas and Marcos Crego-García
"Reduction of radar performance for target detection within forests", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 10(2), 026028 (Jun 01, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.10.026028


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