Remote Sensing Applications and Decision Support

Spatial differentiation and morphologic characteristics of China’s urban core zones based on geomorphologic partition

[+] Author Affiliations
Min Zhao

Nanjing University, School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing, China

Collaborative Innovation Center of South China Sea Studies, Nanjing, China

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information Systems, Beijing, China

Weiming Cheng

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information Systems, Beijing, China

Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographic Information Resource Development and Application, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China

Chenghu Zhou

Nanjing University, School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing, China

Collaborative Innovation Center of South China Sea Studies, Nanjing, China

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information Systems, Beijing, China

Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographic Information Resource Development and Application, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China

Manchun Li

Nanjing University, School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing, China

Collaborative Innovation Center of South China Sea Studies, Nanjing, China

Nan Wang, Qiangyi Liu

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information Systems, Beijing, China

University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 11(1), 016041 (Mar 29, 2017). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.11.016041
History: Received December 12, 2016; Accepted March 13, 2017
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Abstract.  Based on a previous study that used the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime light images to partition different types of night-lit areas within individual cities, 456 urban core zones in China, representing highly developed areas in 2012, were extracted. Then, several morphologic indices were selected for characterizing for each urban core zone, and the spatial differentiation and morphologic characteristics of urban core zones located within different geomorphologic regions in China were quantitatively analyzed. The results showed that urban core zones were most widely distributed in the eastern region comprising hilly plains, with a decreasing distribution trend from northeast to southwest, and the least distribution was in the Tibetan Plateau. The contours of most of these zones appeared to be relatively simple and compact, and evidenced seven shapes. Regions at lower altitudes with flat terrains were more likely to demonstrate a wide range of urban core zones, especially those with complex shapes. This study represents a preliminary effort toward the construction of an interactive coupling mechanism for urban and geomorphologic environments (e.g., altitude, relief of land surface, geomorphologic types, geomorphologic region). Its findings contribute to enhancing understanding of the spatial morphologic characteristics of highly developed areas in China.

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Citation

Min Zhao ; Weiming Cheng ; Chenghu Zhou ; Manchun Li ; Nan Wang, et al.
"Spatial differentiation and morphologic characteristics of China’s urban core zones based on geomorphologic partition", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 11(1), 016041 (Mar 29, 2017). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.11.016041


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