Remote Sensing Applications and Decision Support

Using temporarily coherent point interferometric synthetic aperture radar for land subsidence monitoring in a mining region of western China

[+] Author Affiliations
Hongdong Fan

China University of Mining and Technology (CUMT), School of Environment Science and Spatial Informatics, Xuzhou, China

Chengdu University of Technology (CDUT), State Key Laboratory of Geohazard Prevention and Geoenvironment Protection, Chengdu, China

Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Department of Signal Theory and Communications (TSC), Barcelona, Spain

Qiang Xu

Chengdu University of Technology (CDUT), State Key Laboratory of Geohazard Prevention and Geoenvironment Protection, Chengdu, China

Zhongbo Hu

Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Department of Signal Theory and Communications (TSC), Barcelona, Spain

Sen Du

China University of Mining and Technology (CUMT), School of Environment Science and Spatial Informatics, Xuzhou, China

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 11(2), 026003 (Apr 06, 2017). doi:10.1117/1.JRS.11.026003
History: Received November 3, 2016; Accepted March 17, 2017
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Abstract.  Yuyang mine is located in the semiarid western region of China where, due to serious land subsidence caused by underground coal exploitation, the local ecological environment has become more fragile. An advanced interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) technique, temporarily coherent point InSAR, is applied to measure surface movements caused by different mining conditions. Fifteen high-resolution TerraSAR-X images acquired between October 2, 2012, and March 27, 2013, were processed to generate time-series data for ground deformation. The results show that the maximum accumulated values of subsidence and velocity were 86 mm and 162  mm/year, respectively; these measurements were taken above the fully mechanized longwall caving faces. Based on the dynamic land subsidence caused by the exploitation of one working face, the land subsidence range was deduced to have increased 38 m in the mining direction with 11 days’ coal extraction. Although some mining faces were ceased in 2009, they could also have contributed to a small residual deformation of overlying strata. Surface subsidence of the backfill mining region was quite small, the maximum only 21 mm, so backfill exploitation is an effective method for reducing the land subsidence while coal is mined.

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© 2017 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Hongdong Fan ; Qiang Xu ; Zhongbo Hu and Sen Du
"Using temporarily coherent point interferometric synthetic aperture radar for land subsidence monitoring in a mining region of western China", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 11(2), 026003 (Apr 06, 2017). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.11.026003


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