Research Papers

How does the global Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) product relate to regionally developed land cover and vegetation products in a semi-arid Australian savanna?

[+] Author Affiliations
Birte Schoettker, Stuart Phinn

The University of Queensland, Centre for Spatial Environmental Research, The School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management, Sir James Foots Building (47A), Brisbane, Queensland 4072 Australia

Michael Schmidt

Remote Sensing Centre, Department of Environment and Resources Management, 80 Meiers Road, Indooroopilly, QLD 4068 Australia

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 4(1), 043538 (June 23, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3463721
History: Received February 9, 2010; Revised May 29, 2010; Accepted June 4, 2010; June 23, 2010; Online June 23, 2010
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Abstract

Spatio-temporally variable information on total vegetation cover is highly relevant to water quality and land management in river catchments adjacent to the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. A time series of the global Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR; 2000-2006) and its underlying biome classification (MOD12Q1) were compared to national land cover and regional, remotely sensed products in the dry-tropical Burdekin River. The MOD12Q1 showed reasonable agreement with a classification of major vegetation groups for 94% of the study area. We then compared dry-seasonal, quality controlled MODIS FPAR observations to (i) Landsat-based woody foliage projective cover (wFPC) (2004) and (ii) MODIS bare ground index (BGI) observations (2001-2003). Statistical analysis of the MODIS FPAR revealed a significant sensitivity to Landsat wFPC-based Vegetation Structural Categories (VSC) and VSC-specific temporal variability over the 2004 dry season. The MODIS FPAR relation to 20 coinciding MODIS BGI dry-seasonal observations was significant (ρ < 0.001) for homogeneous areas of low wFPC. Our results show that the global MODIS FPAR can be used to identify VSC, represent VSC-specific variability of PAR absorption, and indicate that the amount, structure, and optical properties of green and non-green vegetation components contribute to the MODIS FPAR signal.

© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

MODIS ; Radiation

Citation

Birte Schoettker ; Stuart Phinn and Michael Schmidt
"How does the global Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) product relate to regionally developed land cover and vegetation products in a semi-arid Australian savanna?", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 4(1), 043538 (June 23, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3463721


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