Special Section on Remote Sensing Applications to Wildland Fire Research in the Eastern United States: Selected Papers from the 2007 EastFIRE Conference

Development of a biomass burning emissions inventory by combining satellite and ground-based information

[+] Author Affiliations
George Pouliot

Air Resources Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Atmospheric Modeling Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

Thomas G. Pace

Office and Air Quality Planning and Standards, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

Biswadev Roy

National Exposure Research Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

Thomas Pierce

Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

David Mobley

National Exposure Research Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 2(1), 021501 (May 16, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2939551
History: Received October 15, 2007; Revised May 8, 2008; Accepted May 9, 2008; May 16, 2008; Online May 16, 2008
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Abstract

A 2005 biomass burning (wildfire, prescribed, and agricultural) emission inventory has been developed for the contiguous United States using a newly developed simplified method of combining information from multiple sources for use in the US EPA's National Emission Inventory (NEI). Our method blends the temporal and spatial resolution of the remote sensing information with the ground based fire size estimate. This method is faster and considerably less expensive than the method used for the 2002 National Emissions Inventory and is more accurate than methods used for 2001 and prior years. In addition, the 2005 fire inventory is the first EPA inventory utilizing remote sensing information. A comparison with the 2002 inventory for wildfire, prescribed, and agricultural fires indicates a large year-to-year variability in wildfire emissions and less variation for prescribed and agricultural fires. Total PM2.5 emissions from wildfires, prescribed burning, and agricultural burning for the contiguous United States were estimated to be 109,000 short tons, 209,000 short tons, and 232,000 short tons, respectively, for 2005. Our total emission estimate for 2005 is 550,000 short tons. Our analysis shows that year-to-year spatial variability accounts for the substantial difference in the wildfire emission estimates.

© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

George Pouliot ; Thomas G. Pace ; Biswadev Roy ; Thomas Pierce and David Mobley
"Development of a biomass burning emissions inventory by combining satellite and ground-based information", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 2(1), 021501 (May 16, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2939551


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