Special Section on Remote Sensing Applications to Wildland Fire Research in the Eastern United States: Selected Papers from the 2007 EastFIRE Conference

Sensitivity of air quality simulation to smoke plume rise

[+] Author Affiliations
Yongqiang Liu, Gary Achtemeier, Scott Goodrick

Forestry Sciences Laboratory, USDA Forest Service, Center for Forest Disturbance Science, Athens, GA 30602

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 2(1), 021503 (May 20, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2938723
History: Received November 7, 2007; Revised March 3, 2008; Accepted May 8, 2008; May 20, 2008; Online May 20, 2008
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Abstract

Plume rise is the height smoke plumes can reach. This information is needed by air quality models such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to simulate physical and chemical processes of point-source fire emissions. This study seeks to understand the importance of plume rise to CMAQ air quality simulation of prescribed burning to plume rise. CMAQ simulations are compared between fire emissions as area and point sources. For point source, Daysmoke is used to calculate plume rise. A burn day in Florida is examined. The results indicate significant sensitivity of simulated PM2.5> (particulate matter with a size smaller than 2.5 μm) concentrations to plume rise. The air quality effects, measured by PM2.5> concentrations at the burning area, are more significant by specifying fire emissions as an area source. The implication of the results for the uncertainty in evaluating the contribution of prescribed burning to regional air pollution is discussed.

© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

Simulations

Citation

Yongqiang Liu ; Gary Achtemeier and Scott Goodrick
"Sensitivity of air quality simulation to smoke plume rise", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 2(1), 021503 (May 20, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2938723


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