Research Papers

Mapping land cover and estimating forest structure using satellite imagery and coarse resolution lidar in the Virgin Islands

[+] Author Affiliations
Todd A. Kennaway

Department of Forest, Rangeland and Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, 1472 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1472

Eileen H. Helmer

International Institute of Tropical Forestry, USDA Forest Service, Jardi´n Bota´nico Sur, Ri´o Piedras, Puerto Rico 00926-1119 Puerto Rico

Michael A. Lefsky

Center for Ecological Analysis of Lidar, Colorado State University, Department of Natural Resources, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1472

Tom A. Brandeis

Southern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 4700 Old Kingston Pike, Knoxville, Tennessee 37919-5206

Kirk R. Sherrill

Center for Ecological Analysis of Lidar, Colorado State University, Department of Natural Resources, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1472

J. Appl. Remote Sens. 2(1), 023551 (December 12, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.3063939
History: Received July 13, 2008; Revised November 25, 2008; Accepted December 3, 2008; December 12, 2008; Online December 12, 2008
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Abstract

Current information on land cover, forest type and forest structure for the Virgin Islands is critical to land managers and researchers for accurate forest inventory and ecological monitoring. In this study, we use cloud free image mosaics of panchromatic sharpened Landsat ETM+ images and decision tree classification software to map land cover and forest type for the Virgin Islands, illustrating a low cost, repeatable mapping approach. Also, we test if coarse-resolution discrete lidar data that are often collected in conjunction with digital orthophotos are useful for mapping forest structural attributes. This approach addresses the factors that affect vegetation distribution and structure by testing if environmental variables can improve regression models of forest height and biomass derived from lidar data. The overall accuracy of the 29 forest and non-forest classes is 72%, while most the forest types are classified with greater than 70% accuracy. Due to the large point spacing of this lidar dataset, it is most appropriate for height measurements of dominant and co-dominant trees (R2> = 72%) due to its inability to accurately represent forest understory. Above ground biomass per hectare is estimated by its direct relationship with plot canopy height (R2> = 0.72%).

© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Todd A. Kennaway ; Eileen H. Helmer ; Michael A. Lefsky ; Tom A. Brandeis and Kirk R. Sherrill
"Mapping land cover and estimating forest structure using satellite imagery and coarse resolution lidar in the Virgin Islands", J. Appl. Remote Sens. 2(1), 023551 (December 12, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3063939


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